Data Protected - Bulgaria

Contributed by Djingov, Gouginski, Kyutchukov & Velichkov

Last updated April 2019

General | Data Protection Laws

National Legislation
National Supervisory Authority
Scope of Application
Personal Data
Sensitive Personal Data
Data Protection Officers
Accountability and Privacy Impact Assessments
Rights of Data Subjects
Security
Transfer of Personal Data to Third Countries
Enforcement

ePrivacy | Marketing and cookies

National Legislation
Cookies
Marketing by E-mail
Marketing by Telephone

_____________________________________________________________________

General | Data Protection Laws

____________________________________________________________

National Legislation

General data protection laws

The General Data Protection Regulation (EU) (2016/679)(“GDPR”).

The Bulgarian Personal Data Protection Act (“PDPA”) was amended on 21 February 2019 to implement the GDPR and to transpose the Law Enforcement Directive.

Entry into force

The GDPR applies from 25 May 2018.

The amended PDPA took effect from 1 March 2019. 

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

National Supervisory Authority

Details of the competent national supervisory authority

The Commission for Personal Data Protection (the “Commission”) stays as the principle national supervisory authority in Bulgaria.

The Commission for Personal Data Protection
2, Prof. Tsvetan Lazarov Blvd.
Sofia – 1592
Bulgaria 

www.cpdp.bg

The effective chairperson of the Commission, Mr. Ventsislav Karadjov, represents Bulgaria at, and is one of the incumbent Vice-Chairmen of, the European Data Protection Board.

Compliance by the judiciary in Bulgaria, including Bulgarian courts and prosecution and investigation state bodies, with the GDPR and the PDPA is subject to the supervision and enforcement of the Inspectorate of the Supreme Judiciary Counsel in Bulgaria. The Inspectorate has the powers and authority in respect of the judiciary that the Commission has in respect of all other controllers and processors.

Notification or registration scheme and timing

There is no obligation to notify regulators of any processing under the GDPR.

Exemptions to notification

Not applicable.

_____________________________________________________________________Top

Scope of Application

What is the territorial scope of application?

The GDPR applies the processing of personal data in the context of the establishment of a controller or processor in the EU.

It also contains express extra-territorial provisions and will apply to controllers or processors based outside the EU that: (i) offer goods or services to individuals in the EU; or (ii) monitor individuals within the EU. Controllers and processors caught by these provisions will need to appoint a representative in the EU, subject to certain limited exemptions.

Is there a concept of a controller and processor?

Yes. The GDPR contains the concept of a controller, who determines the purpose and means of processing, and a processor, who just processes personal data on behalf of the controller.

Both controllers and processors are subject to the rules in the GDPR, but the obligations placed on processors are more limited. 

Are both manual and electronic records subject to data protection legislation?

Yes. The GDPR applies to both electronic records and structured hard copy records.

Are there any national derogations?

The GDPR does not apply to law enforcement activities which are instead subject to the Law Enforcement Directive. The GDPR also does not apply to areas of law that are outside the scope of Union law, such as national security, and does not apply to purely personal or household activity.

The PDPA only permits the processing of data relating to deceased natural persons where the controller or processor has valid legal basis for such data processing. The controller or processor must implement appropriate measures to avoid such data processing having a negative effect on the rights and freedoms of natural persons or the public interest.

_____________________________________________________________________Top

Personal Data

What is personal data?

Personal data is information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person.

This is a broad term and includes a wide range of information. The GDPR expressly states it includes online identifiers such as IP addresses and cookie identifiers.

Is information about legal entities personal data?

No. However, information about sole traders and partnerships is likely to be personal data.

What are the rules for processing personal data?

All processing of personal data must comply with all six general data quality principles. Personal data must be: (a) processed fairly and lawfully; (b) collected for specific, explicit and legitimate purposes and not processed in a manner incompatible with those purposes; (c) adequate, relevant and not excessive; (d) accurate and, where necessary, up to date; (e) kept in an identifiable form for no longer than necessary; and (f) kept secure.

The processing of personal data must also satisfy at least one condition for processing personal data. These conditions are that the processing is: (a) carried out with the data subject’s consent; (b) necessary for the performance of a contract with the data subject; (c) necessary for compliance with a legal obligation; (d) necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject; (e) necessary for the public interest or in the exercise of official authority; or (f) necessary for the controller’s or recipient’s legitimate interests, except where overridden by the interests of the data subject.

These rules are almost identical to the core requirements for processing personal data in the Data Protection Directive.

Are there any formalities to obtain consent to process personal data?

Obtaining consent will become much harder under the GDPR. 

To be valid, consent must be in clear and plain language and, where sought in writing, separate from other matters. Consent must be based on affirmative action so pre-ticked boxes are not acceptable. Consent might not be valid if: (i) there is any detriment to the data subject for refusing; (ii) there is an imbalance of power; (iii) consent for multiple purposes is bundled together; or (iv) the consent is a condition of entering into a contract. Finally, consent can be withdrawn at any time.

In practice, other processing conditions should be relied on where possible. Consent will only be an appropriate processing condition if the individual has a genuine choice over the matter, for example, whether to be sent marketing materials. 

The Article 29 Working Party has issued Guidelines on Consent (WP259).

Are there any special rules when processing personal data about children?

Consent from a child in relation to online services will only be valid if authorised by a parent. A child is someone under 16 years old, though Member States may reduce this age to 13.

In Bulgaria, the PDPA sets out that consent-based processing (which includes but is not limited to processing in relation to online services) of personal data of children below 14 years of age may only take place if a valid consent is obtained by the parents or legal guardians of the child.

The PDPA does not contain specific additional provisions regulating the processing of personal data about children aged 14 to 18 years. However, under general rules of Bulgarian law these children have limited legal capacity and the validity of their legal acts and transactions are subject to the prior consent of their parents or legal guardians, except for minor transactions relating to children’s on-going and customary needs and save for transactions where children receive the benefit in consideration for their labour. In light of this rule, consent-based processing of personal data of children aged between 14 and 18 will often require the prior consent of the child’s parent or legal guardian.

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Sensitive Personal Data

What is sensitive personal data?

Sensitive personal data is personal data consisting of racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, or trade union membership, genetic data, biometric data, data concerning health or data concerning a natural person’s sex life or sexual orientation.

The inclusion of genetic and biometric data is new and an extension to the types of sensitive personal data in the Data Protection Directive.
Information about criminal offences is dealt with separately and is subject to even tighter controls.

Are there additional rules for processing sensitive personal data?

Sensitive personal data may only be processed if a condition for processing sensitive personal data is satisfied. A condition arises where the processing: (a) is carried out with the data subject’s explicit consent; (b) is necessary for a legal obligation in the field of employment law; (c) is necessary to protect the vital interests of the data subject or another person where the data subject is unable to give consent; (d) is carried out by a non-profit-seeking body and relates to members of that body or persons who have regular contact; (e) relates to data made public by the data subject; (f) is necessary for legal claims; (g) is for reasons of substantial public interest under EU or Member State law; (h) is necessary for healthcare reasons; (i) is necessary for public health reasons; or (j) is necessary for archiving, scientific or historical research purposes or statistical purposes and is based on EU or Member State law.

The PDPA also allows the processing of sensitive personal data also where the processing is carried out for journalistic purposes or for the purposes of academic, artistic or literary expression. Processing of sensitive personal data for these purposes is deemed lawful if it complies with special terms and conditions also set out in the PDPA.

Are there additional rules for processing information about criminal offences?

It is only possible to process information about criminal convictions or offences if: (a) it is carried out under the control of official authority; or (b) when the processing is authorised by EU or Member State law.

Under Bulgarian law processing of criminal record data is permitted in exceptional cases under: (i) the Private Security Activities Act with respect to employees for the positions of “head of security activities” and “security guard” (processing for employment purposes); (ii) the Insurance Code with respect to members of the management and controlling bodies of insurance and reinsurance companies (processing for licensing purposes); and (iii) Ordinances under the Credit Institutions Act with respect to members of the management and controlling bodies of banks and NBFI (processing for licensing purposes).

Are there any formalities to obtain consent to process sensitive personal data?

Consent to process sensitive personal data must be explicit. The general restrictions on consent, set out above, will also apply. This suggests a degree of formality, such as ticking a box containing the express words “I consent”. It is unlikely explicit consent could be obtained through a course of conduct.

It is customary in Bulgaria and required by the Commission – though it is not strictly required under the law – that the explicit consent for the processing of sensitive personal data is obtained in writing. 

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Data Protection Officers

When must a data protection officer be appointed?

Both controllers and processors must appoint a data protection officer if: (i) they are a public authority; (ii) their core activities consist of regular and systematic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale; or (iii) their core activities consist of processing sensitive personal data on a large scale (including processing information about criminal offences).

What are the duties of the data protection officer?

The data protection officer must be involved in all data protection issues and cannot be dismissed or penalised for performing their role. The data protection officer must report directly to the highest level of management. 

The Article 29 Working Party has issued Guidelines on Data Protection Officers (WP243).

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Accountability and Privacy Impact Assessments

Is there a general accountability obligation?

The GDPR adds a new general accountability obligation under which you must not only comply with these new rules, but also be able to demonstrate you comply with them. This means ensuring suitable policies are in place supported by audit and training.

Are privacy impact assessments mandatory?

A privacy impact assessment must be conducted where “high risk” processing is carried out. This includes: (a) systematic and extensive profiling that produces legal effects or significantly affects individuals; (b) processing sensitive personal data on a large scale; and (c) systematic monitoring of a publicly accessible area on a large scale (e.g. CCTV).

The Article 29 Working Party has subsequently issued Guidelines on Data Protection Impact Assessments (WP 248). It suggests there are nine criteria to consider to determine whether to conduct a privacy impact assessment, and that an assessment should be made if two or more of those criteria are met. This is arguably wider than the criteria set out in the paragraph above. 

In February 2019, the Commission approved and made public a list of the kind of processing operations which are subject to the requirement for a data protection impact assessment pursuant to the terms of GDPR. The list includes the following kind of processing operations: (i) a large-scale and regular processing of biometric personal data for unique identification of individual(s); (ii) processing genetic data for profiling which has legal effects on or similarly significantly affects relevant data subject(s); (iii) processing location data for profiling with legal effects on or similarly significantly affects relevant on data subject(s); (iv) a large-scale processing of personal data where the data have not been obtained directly from the data subjects and data subjects are not aware, and have not been informed of the processing; (v) the personal data processing is carried out by a controller not established in the EU and having its designated representative in EU is in the territory of Bulgaria; (vi) regular and systemic processing where data subjects are not informed of their rights; (vii) processing of child’s personal data in relation to  direct offering of information society services; and (viii) large scale migration of personal data to new technologies.

The Commission has expressly stated that the list is indicative and not exhaustive. The purpose of the list is to assist controllers in Bulgaria in fulfilling their obligations relating to data protection impact assessment and, in particular, in determining whether or not their processing activity requires a data protection impact assessment.

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Rights of Data Subjects

Privacy notices

A controller must provide data subjects with a privacy notice setting out how the individual’s personal data will be processed. The privacy notice must contain the enhanced transparency information.

The Article 29 Working Party has issued Guidelines on Transparency (WP260).

It is customary in Bulgaria, and often required by the Commission, that controllers give privacy notices to data subjects in Bulgaria in writing and in Bulgarian language in order for the controllers to be able to demonstrate that the information has been fairly provided to the data subject.

Under the PDPA, employer must adopt internal company rules and procedures where they introduce: (i) a whistleblowing system or other system for reporting workplace infringements; (ii) limitations or restrictions on the usage of the organisation’s resources for private or non-work related purposes; and/or (iii) introduction of a monitoring or access control system relating to workplace attendance and discipline. As a minimum, they must notify employees in a fair and accurate manner about the scope and operation of the relevant arrangement and about the employees’ and employer’s obligations thereunder.

A controller may be released in full or in part from the obligation to give data subjects a privacy notice where they lawfully processes personal data for journalistic purposes or for the purposes of academic, artistic or literary expression or where the processing is limited to photographing a data subject in the course of his/her public activity or at a public place for the purposes of creation of a photographic or audio-visual work.

Rights to access information

Data subjects will have a right to access copies of their personal data by making a written request to the controller. The initial request is free, though a charge can be made for subsequent requests. Controllers can refuse the request if it is manifestly unfounded or excessive. The response must be provided within a month, though this can be extended by two months if the request is complex. 

The PDPA further sets out minimum contents that the written request must have, including clear identification of the data subject, description of the request or inquiry to the controller, contact details and preferred method of communication for the data subject. The request must be dated and signed by the data subject. If submitted by a proxy, the relevant power of attorney or other authorization document must be enclosed to the request.

Under the PDPA a controller may refuse to respond to a data subject’s request for information access in full or in part where the controller lawfully processes personal data for journalistic purposes or for the purposes of academic, artistic or literary expression or where the processing is limited to photographing a data subject in the course of his/her public activity or at a public place for the purposes of creation of a photographic or audio-visual work. 

Rights to data portability

Data subjects will also have a right to data portability where the condition for processing personal data is consent or the performance of a contract. It entitles individuals to obtain any personal data they have “provided” to the controller in a machine-readable format. Individuals can also ask for the data to be transferred directly from one controller to another. There is no right to charge fees for this service.

The Article 29 Working Party has issued Guidelines on data portability (WP242).

The PDPA sets out that the right may be exercised only in writing by a request with minimum contents, including clear identification of the data subject, description of the request or inquiry to the controller, contact details and preferred method of communication for the data subject. The request must be dated and signed by the data subject. If submitted by a proxy, the relevant power of attorney or other authorisation document must be enclosed in the request.

Right to be forgotten

A data subject can ask that their data be deleted in certain circumstances. However, those circumstances are relatively limited, for example where the processing is based on consent, that consent is withdrawn and there are no other grounds for processing. Even where the right does arise, there are range of exemptions, for example where there is a legal obligation to retain the data. 

The PDPA sets out that the right may be exercised only in writing by a request with minimum contents, including clear identification of the data subject, description of the request or inquiry to the controller, contact details and preferred method of communication for the data subject. The request must be dated and signed by the data subject. If submitted by a proxy, the relevant power of attorney or other authorisation document must be enclosed in the request. 

Objection to direct marketing

A data subject can object to their personal data being processed for direct marketing purposes at any time. This includes the processing of their personal data for profiling purposes.

The PDPA sets out that the right may be exercised only in writing by a request with minimum contents, including clear identification of the data subject, description of the request or inquiry to the controller, contact details and preferred method of communication for the data subject. The request must be dated and signed by the data subject. If submitted by a proxy, the relevant power of attorney or other authorisation document must be enclosed in the request. 

Other rights

The GDPR contains a range of other rights, including a right to have inaccurate data corrected. There is also a right to object to processing being carried out in the performance of a public task or under the legitimate interests condition.

Finally, there are controls on taking decisions based solely on automated decision making that produce legal effects or similarly significantly affects the data subject. The Article 29 Working Party has issued Guidelines on Automated Decision Making and Profiling (WP251).

These other rights are also not absolute and their enjoyment by data subjects may be subject to certain limitations under the PDPA. Like the rights specified above, data subjects can exercise these other rights only in writing with a dated and signed request to the controller.

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Security

Security requirements in order to protect personal data

The GDPR contains a general obligation to implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to protect personal data.

In addition, controllers and processors must ensure, where appropriate: (i) the pseudonymisation and encryption of personal data; (ii) the ability to ensure the ongoing confidentiality, integrity, availability and resilience of its information technology systems; (iii) the ability to restore the availability and access to personal data in a timely manner in the event of a physical or technical incident; and (iv) a process for regularly testing, assessing and evaluating the effectiveness of technical and organisational measures for ensuring the security of the processing. 

The PDPA requires stronger appropriate technical and organisational measures where the processing is massive or includes systemic and massive video surveillance of public areas.

The PDPA also bans controllers or processors copying ID documents unless this is expressly allowed by a primary legal act or the controller offers e-services and uses the personal identification number of a data subject as the only means of identification of the data subject for remote access.

Specific rules governing processing by third party agents (processors)

A controller must ensure that any processor it instructs will ensure adequate security for personal data and otherwise meet the requirements of the GDPR.

The controller must have written contracts with its processor containing the enhanced processor clauses.

Notice of breach laws

A personal data breach must be notified to the relevant supervisory authority unless it is unlikely to result in a risk to data subjects. The notification must, where feasible, be made within 72 hours. If the personal data breach is a high risk for data subjects, those data subjects must also be notified. 

The Article 29 Working Party has issued Guidelines on Personal Data Breach Notification (WP250).

Specific notice of breach laws apply to the electronic communications sector under the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive

According to the PDPA the Commissions keeps a record of received data breach notices. The record is not public. 

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Transfer of Personal Data to Third Countries

Restrictions on transfers to third countries

The GDPR contains a restriction on transborder dataflows. Transfers can take place if it: (i) is to a whitelisted country; (ii) is made pursuant to a set of Model Contracts; (ii) is made pursuant to binding corporate rules; (iv) is made to an importer who has signed up to an approved code or obtained an approved certification; or (v) is otherwise approved by the relevant supervisory authority.

Transfers are also possible if an individual derogation applies. These derogations allow a transfer if it: (i) is made with the data subject’s explicit consent; (ii) is necessary for the performance of a contract with, or in the interests of, the data subject; (iii) is necessary or legally required on important public interest grounds, or for legal claims; (iv) is necessary to protect the vital interests of the data subject; (v) is made from a public register; or (vi) is made under the so-called minor transfer exemption.

The position is broadly the same as under the Data Protection Directive. One notable change is the introduction of the so-called minor transfer exemption, though that exemption will be very hard to rely on in practice.

The European Data Protection Board has issued Guidelines on derogations applicable to international transfers (2/2018).

Notification and approval of national regulator (including notification of use of Model Contracts)

In general, there is no need for prior approval from a supervisory authority. However, this depends on the justification for the transfer. 

For example, there will be no obligation to get approval for the use of Model Contracts (though it is possible some supervisory authorities may want to be notified of their use). In contrast, it will be necessary to get approval to rely on binding corporate rules, and the supervisory authority must be informed of transfers made using the minor transfers exemption.

Use of binding corporate rules

The GDPR places binding corporate rules on a statutory footing. It will be possible to obtain authorisation from one supervisory authority that will cover transfers from anywhere in the EU.

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Enforcement

Fines

The GDPR is intended to make data protection a boardroom issue. It introduces an antitrust-type sanction regime with fines of up to 4% of annual worldwide turnover or €20m, whichever is the greater. These fines apply to breaches of many of the provisions of the GDPR, including failure to comply with the six general data quality principles or carrying out processing without satisfying a condition for processing personal data.

A limited number of breaches fall into a lower tier and so are subject to fines of up to 2% of annual worldwide turnover or €10m, whichever is the greater. Failing to notify a personal data breach or failing to put an adequate contract in place with a processor fall into this lower tier.

The Article 29 Working Party has issued Guidelines on administrative fines (WP253).

The fines in the GDPR can also be imposed by the Commission for breaches of some of the provisions under the PDPA. For example, unlawful processing of child’s personal data in breach of the PDPA triggers the higher tier of fine under the GDPR. The introduction of a whistleblowing system without complying with the additional rules in the PDPA can be sanctioned by a fine under the lower tier of the GDPR. Other breaches of the PDPA are punishable by a default fine of up to BGN 5,000 (approx. EUR 2,500).

Applicable fines are doubled if the breach is repetitive, i.e. committed within one year from the date of a final and enforceable decision of the Commission by which the Commission imposed a sanction for the same type of breach.   

Where the Commission imposes a fine, that decision is subject to administrative court review. 

Imprisonment

The transfer or distribution of computer or system passwords which results in the illegitimate disclosure of personal data constitutes a crime under the Bulgarian Criminal Code. The penalty includes imprisonment for up to three years.

Compensation

Data subjects have a right to compensation in respect of material and non-material damage.

The PDPA recognises a right of action for data subjects exercisable before the administrative court of competent jurisdiction. Before adjudicating on the damages claim, the court must first establish whether or not a data protection breach has been committed by the respondent controller or processor. 

Other powers

Regulators will have a range of other powers and sanctions at their disposal. This includes investigative powers, such as the ability to demand information from controllers and processors, and to carry out audits. They will also have corrective powers enabling them to issue warnings or reprimands, to enforce an individual’s rights and to issue a temporary or permanent ban on processing. 

The Commission exercises these other powers also by issuing decisions which may be appealed to the administrative court. 

Practice

According to the Commission’s 2018 Annual Report, from 1 January 2018 until 25 May 2018, the Commission carried out a total of 243 on-site examinations. The majority of these examinations were preliminary investigations and executed in relation to the issuance of approvals for processing of sensitive personal data under the PDPA before the GDPR and amended PDPA came into effect.

In eight of the on-site examinations, the Commission found non-compliance with the PDPA and took administrative action against the respective controllers. From 25 May until 31 December 2018, the Commission initiated 611 and completed 552 examinations (some of which had been initiated before 25 May 2018). In 501 of the completed cases, no breach of the data protection legislations was established. In period from 25 May until 31 December 2018 the Commission completed 60 audits and established non-compliance in one case, issued an official warning to the controller in ten cases and gave the controller binding instructions relating to the data processing and their protection in another ten cases.

In February 2019, the Commission issued its first enforcement decision under GDPR. A bank’s official made more than one phone call to an ex-customer. The purpose of the calls was to contact a neighbour of the ex-customer who had overdue payments. The Commission issued a permanent ban on the processing of personal data about the ex-customer. The Commission also fined the controller approx. EUR 500 for breach of the purpose limitation principle. The decision was not appealed before court. 

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

ePrivacy | Marketing and cookies

_____________________________________________________________

National Legislation

ePrivacy laws

Article 13 of the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive has been implemented through the Electronic Communications Act (the “ECA”), promulgated in the State Gazette, Issue No. 41 of 22 May 2007, last amended and supplemented in the State Gazette, Issue No. 17 of 26 February 2019. The ECA came into force on 26 May 2007.

The rules of the E-Commerce Act, promulgated in the State Gazette, Issue No. 51 of 23 June 2006 (in force since 24 December 2006), last amended by the State Gazette, Issue No. 17 of 26 February 2019, are also of relevance.

Some of the amendments to the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive, such as the obligation on providers of public electronic communication services to notify the Commission of personal data breaches, have been implemented by virtue of amendments to the ECA, adopted in December 2011. However, other amendments to the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive have not been implemented into Bulgarian national law. For example, the E-Commerce Act has not been amended yet to implement the consent requirements for cookies.

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Cookies

Conditions for use of cookies

The E-Commerce Act allows the use of cookies provided that the user has been informed of the use of cookies and he/she has been given the opportunity to refuse the storage of or access to such cookies. Such restrictions are not applicable: (i) to any subsequent use of cookies in so far that the user has not explicitly objected to such use; and (ii) the cookies are used for the sole purpose of carrying out the transmission of a communication over an electronic communication network or for the provision of an information society service requested by the user.

However, the amendments to the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive, requiring express consent for the storage of or access to cookies, have not been implemented yet.

Regulatory guidance on the use of cookies

There is no effective regulatory guidance on the use of cookies.

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Marketing by E-mail

Conditions for direct marketing by e-mail to individual subscribers

The ECA requires the consent of the individual subscriber as a condition for legally making direct marketing and advertising by e-mail with or without human intervention. Such consent is subject to withdrawal at any time.

Conditions for direct marketing by e-mail to corporate subscribers

Using the defined term “subscriber” to cover legal and natural persons, using or applying for usage of public electronic communications services, the ECA does not differentiate between individual or corporate subscribers with respect to the conditions for legally performing direct marketing by e-mail. Thus, corporate subscribers may be sent direct marketing e-mails only subject to their consent to that effect.

Additionally, pursuant to the E-Commerce Act, the Bulgarian Commission on Consumer Protection keeps a register of the e-mail addresses of legal entities which have expressly opposed receiving unsolicited commercial communication. Sending unsolicited commercial communication to those e-mail addresses, including for direct marketing purposes, is prohibited.

Exemptions and other issues

As an exemption to the rule of the ECA, no prior consent is required for cases where the similar products and services exemption applies.

The ECA prohibits direct marketing and advertising e-mails from being sent if: (i) the identity of the sender is disguised or concealed; or (ii) the provided opt-out address is not valid.

Pursuant to the E-commerce Act, in case of non-solicited communication, the sender must also include the eCommerce information.

_____________________________________________________________________ Top

Marketing by Telephone

Conditions for direct marketing by telephone to individual subscribers (excludes automated calls)

Pursuant to the ECA, direct marketing and advertising by telephone is subject to the same conditions and exemptions as e-mails. Thus, such telephone communications are allowed only subject to the consent of the subscribers. Additionally, a Bulgarian regulation on the rules of issuing of telephone directories expressly provides for the possibility for indexing those subscribers that have expressly consented to receiving unsolicited commercial communications.

Conditions for direct marketing by telephone to corporate subscribers (excludes automated calls)

Since the ECA does not differentiate between natural and legal entities, the same rules apply with respect to corporate subscribers. Thus, such telephone calls are allowed only subject to the consent of the subscribers. As is the case with individual subscribers, telephone directory indexing is a way, provided for by the law, of expressing consent to receiving unsolicited commercial communications.

Exemptions and other issues

Direct marketing and advertising by telephone is subject to the same exemptions and other issues as marketing or advertising by e-mail.

_____________________________________________________________________ Top